Weddings

 

 

Weddings and what you will need to know

Interfaith /No Faith Wedding

Civil Partnership

Hand-fastings and Hand-partings

Viking style marriage

Elopement

 

Weddings

The legal bit:

There are two types of legal marriage in Scotland

A civil ceremony held by a registrar, this can be combined with a ceremony later.

A religious or belief, interfaith, no faith ceremony , held by a minister, priest or interfaith ministers as ordained and nominated by One Spirit Interfaith Foundation.

 

We officiate for opposite sex marriage, same sex marriage and same sex civil partnerships.

 

About 10 – 12 weeks but not later than 29 days before the marriage the couple complete M10 forms or CP10 forms from the registry office (one for each party to the marriage) and take them or send them to the registry office closest to where you will be married. The registry office will process the forms to ensure the legality of the marriage and will produce the Marriage schedule or Civil partnership Schedule. So please bear this in mind when planning your dates. One week before the ceremony the couple will collect the schedule and bring it to the ceremony. We cannot complete a legal wedding or civil partnership without it. The signed schedule must be returned to the registry office within 3 days of the ceremony.

If you are subject to immigration controls you will need to provide a Declaration of Immigration Status form, which can be obtained from the registrar or the NRS website. For further information the links below.

marriage@gro-cotland.gsi.giv.uk . http://www.highland.gov.uk/info/640/birth_marriage_and_death/314/marriages_and_civil_partnerships

So I hope that is all clear.

 

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Interfaith: Interfaith ministers are trained to some degree in the essence of 10 or so religions and can create a ceremony that has meaning to a couple of mixed religious belief or background or who wish a no faith ceremony, or who want aspects of another faith in their ceremony. I have a bit more knowledge of Hand-fastings and Viking marriage ceremonies, they have some nice practical elements to them. I love to create  ceremony with any faith or none, that is entirely personal to the couple, and with readings, songs and poetry of their own choosing or ones I can suggest.

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Wedding Vow Renewal: This ceremony is useful after the couple have been through a challenging times or a change and want to renew their vows in the light of some years of experience in marriage and with a deeper understanding. It is much like a marriage without the legal part and without the declaration at the end. It can be a particularly powerful ceremony to honour the strengthening and deepening understanding and connection between the couple.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hand-fasting and Hand-parting; Hand-fasting is an earth based tradition, it involves a cord or ribbon being tied around the couples wrists to denote the many ways their lives are woven together, but it is not a restrictive bind, so the couple continue to grow as individuals. It also has a optional time element, traditionally it was made for 1 year and 1 day, and so can be renewed each year, although the couple can choose any period, or state 'while love lasts' or leave it out.

If this is not used as a legal wedding then the couple can also respectfully and lovingly part with a Hand-parting, an equally beautiful ceremony. If there is a legal aspect to the marriage then the legal separation is also required.

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Viking wedding: I have been to Iceland to research this, and there is a great deal of information about the dowry settlement and very little about the actual ceremony. But in the research I have found some aspects of the sagas that fit nicely into a marriage ceremony. We use the crossing of the family swords to denote the joining of the clans, and Thor's Hammer, which carries his great power, is returned to the groom by the celebrant and he in turn places this into the lap of the bride, as an acknowledgment of the power sharing. It can end with drinking horns raised and a Viking toast To the children of Odin.

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Quaich – the loving cup: Is a particularly Scottish tradition which involves a toast in a special silver bowl to the loves of the ages, and drinking deeply from the cup of love and sharing the cup around.

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I will create a sacred space where ever the ceremony is held and invoke the spirits of the four directions, the land, our helpers, guides and ancestors, according to the couple's beliefs,  so that the union is witnessed both horizontally and vertically. I will bring an alter table and all that is needed for the ceremony.

 

Rev. Ocean Graham